tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-32194040743016248222017-01-27T12:01:03.555-05:00Food for Primal ThoughtThis is about my journey to primal eating and exercise. Recipes, meals, progress, and other primal thoughts are included.Laurie Donaldsonnoreply@blogger.comBlogger137125tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-36746095906219284042017-01-04T19:38:00.000-05:002017-01-04T19:38:02.609-05:00It's been a long time!Well, hello. Bet you thought I was gone for good, didn't you? I'm baaaack. Life's been good. I am now a Primal Blueprint Certified Coach, still a teacher of Anatomy and Biology, and I've decided to reopen the blog to add recipes, post some insights, and just catch up. Why not?<br /><br />I started a group at work of people who are interested in pursuing health. Not weight loss necessarily, though that will come for some, but health. The ability to live a long life without what seems to be the norm these days &nbsp;- developing some chronic life-changing disorder such as arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, etc. Morphing into a life of going to doctors, taking drugs to treat symptoms but never the cause, becoming sedentary and wondering where your youth went. Hm, not the life I want. I want to keep going until my last moment and drop dead in my sleep in my own bed. <br /><br />How to do that? Get off the train of the Standard American Diet. Eat like your body has evolved to do over a span of 2 million years. We ate all parts of meats from animals that also ate what they evolved to eat. We ate herbs, fresh plants, berries and fruits in season. There were no apples in spring and no strawberries in fall- you had to wait until the right seasons for those treasures.<br /><br />Lift heavy things, move around (walk) a lot, don't do cardio every single day like you are running from lions who are going to eat you. Sprint occasionally but keep it short.<br /><br />Turn off the blue light-emitting cell phones, TVs, laptops, and go to bed and get some sleep.<br /><br />Play, relax, enjoy life, simplify. Your kids don't need to participate in every activity designed for children - tell them to go outside and play in the dirt and get some of the dirt in their gut where it belongs. Better yet, do it with them. Plant a garden and grow some stuff with them.<br /><br />Buy meats that have been raised properly - outside, eating pasture or bugs or other animals. Animals raised in confined feedlots or warehouses of filth and fed grains which kill them (and us) are not healthy. It is cruel and detrimental to the environment. Animals raised on pasture properly build the soil which sequesters carbon and the environment rejoices. If you want to be a vegan, be prepared to not be entirely healthy in the long term and at least don't contribute to environmental damage by buying monoculture ingredients like corn, soy, and wheat products.<br /><br />Go forth and be healthy. It's a great way to live.Laurie Donaldsonhttps://plus.google.com/100168096976428830139noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-72580268377515147742014-01-22T18:04:00.002-05:002014-01-22T18:04:47.119-05:00No-Bake Gluten and Dairy-free Key Lime Pie<span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I haven't posted a recipe on here in a very long time but I didn't want to lose this one since it was one of those throw-together-altered-recipes that was mostly in my head. &nbsp;Not all of those turn out well, but this one did!</span><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_VyOJIPVk6s/UuBOHRc623I/AAAAAAAAAHI/Vwli28__JrY/s1600/1620858_10152108256709927_660476153_n.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_VyOJIPVk6s/UuBOHRc623I/AAAAAAAAAHI/Vwli28__JrY/s1600/1620858_10152108256709927_660476153_n.jpg" height="320" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><u>Filling</u>:</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">6 eggs</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/2 cup honey (up to 3/4 if you like a little sweeter)</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">zest of 1 lime</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/2 cup lime juice from fresh limes</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1 tbsp lemon juice</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/2 cup coconut oil, melted</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/4 cup butter, melted</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/3 cup water</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">2 tsp gelatin (I used Great Lakes brand - the kind that gels)</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><u>Crust</u>:</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1 cup macadamia nuts (unsalted)</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">4-5 dates (I used Sonnewalds date rolls rolled in coconut because that is what I had on hand)</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">For the crust:</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Chop nuts and dates in a food processor until the mixture is moist but not like nut butter. It will be more meal-like. &nbsp; Press into a pie plate and chill.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">For the filling:</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">In a large saucepan, whisk the eggs and honey over low heat. &nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Add the zest and whisk in.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Add the coconut oil and butter and whisk in.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Add the lime juice - keep whisking. &nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Turn up the heat to medium-low and keep whisking. &nbsp;The mixture will thicken but you don't want it to boil. &nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Remove it from the heat when it thickens.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">In a small bowl, mix the water and gelatin. &nbsp;Microwave for 15-30 seconds or until it just boils.&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Whisk the gelatin into the filling. &nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">If you have lumps or any hardened egg pieces, simply strain through a mesh strainer.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Pour the filling into your crust.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Place in the fridge until set (about 2-3 hours).</span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Enjoy! &nbsp;I suppose you could add a topping, but I liked it as is. &nbsp;This is not overly sweet - if you like really sweet desserts, add more honey.</span></div></div>Laurie Donaldsonhttps://plus.google.com/100168096976428830139noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-48063106829817555292013-11-30T16:36:00.001-05:002013-11-30T16:38:00.294-05:00Hi All,<br />This blog has been laying low for a long time. &nbsp;I just ran out of inspiration and ideas for new content, but the information and recipes are still valuable to me, so I will keep the blog up for my own use and for anyone else who would like to peruse its content. &nbsp;Three things changed my life and health in this cumulative order: going gluten free, eating real food based on ancestral eating (a.k.a. paleo or primal), and weightlifting (the Olympic kind). &nbsp;At 54, I feel better than I did when I was 19. &nbsp;Paleo is changing and maturing over time as any movement/discovery/trend should do. &nbsp;There is still a lot of in-fighting over stupid stuff like whether one should eat dairy/starches/sugar/non-organic vegetables/fish oil/eggs, etc. but the bottom line is that you have to experiment with what works for you. &nbsp;With strength training, I found I needed a few more starches in my diet. &nbsp;I eat some sugary treats sometimes. &nbsp;I found out dairy gives me hives and joint pain (even the raw kind which I have easy access to). &nbsp;Boo. But what works for me might not work for someone else. &nbsp;They might need to cut more carbs or eat more dairy or add more fat. &nbsp;Do what works for you. &nbsp;There is no need for vitriol and diatribes against each other. Eat real food almost all of the time. &nbsp;Eat food that is properly raised whether it is plant or animal. &nbsp;Grains are probably not good for most people but if you can eat them fine, just don't try to give them to me please. To each his own is a good phrase to live by in most cases. &nbsp;Enjoy! &nbsp;I might pop back in from time to time. :)Laurie Donaldsonhttps://plus.google.com/100168096976428830139noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-5408877199718321302012-12-30T20:58:00.003-05:002012-12-30T20:58:51.097-05:00The True Beauty of Paleo<span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I have a farrier for my horses that I have known for probably 20 years now. &nbsp;At least 4 times per year, I see this person at my farm and he and I talk about various things for the 2 hours or so it takes him to trim 1 horse and 4 ponies. &nbsp; We talk about many things, but we have a common interest in food and nutrition. &nbsp;For the last three years at least, I have tried to convince him to go gluten-free with an emphasis on paleo over the last two. &nbsp;I've lent him a few books, which he dutifully returns and he always said he wanted to try it, but never took the plunge. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">The ponies and horse were a bit overdue for a trim this time around and so it has been a good three months since I saw the farrier last. &nbsp;I knew as soon as I saw him that he had indeed taken the plunge. &nbsp;We jumped right into conversation and he told me he had lost 41 pounds, his blood pressure had dropped to normal levels, his arthritis had decreased considerably and any intestinal issues he had were gone. &nbsp;He looked great - no more bags under his eyes, fit and trim, and just overall healthy and happy. &nbsp;His only complaint was that he felt so much better that he tended to overdo things he had avoided in the past, aggravating some deteriorated discs in his back (a side effect of a profession that is notoriously hard on the back), but overall, even his back felt better.</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">He had always eaten pretty well, avoiding processed foods. &nbsp;An avid hunter, he ate venison and even bear meat regularly. &nbsp;So the major changes he made were to eliminate all grains and most sugar from his diet. &nbsp;In effect, he was eating paleo - good meats, vegetables, and fruits. &nbsp;He said he regularly had eggs, bacon, and potatoes fried in lard for breakfast and was still losing about a pound a week or so. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">The beauty of paleo is that there is no extra cost to it, no diet pills or drugs, no purchased meal plans, no special bars or shakes. &nbsp;It is just eating real food that we evolved to eat over 2 million years - pastured (or hunted) meats, vegetables, and fruits. &nbsp;It eliminates grains, processed junk, and frankenfoods. &nbsp;It is simple and the information is free. &nbsp;But the&nbsp;true beauty of paleo is seeing someone who has suffered various maladies from the inflammatory diet of our modern age return to health again and pass on that knowledge to others so they may do the same.</span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-43858582838401802772012-09-30T09:58:00.001-04:002013-03-03T09:44:23.992-05:00Sports in Baltimore<span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I am not really a huge sports fan. &nbsp;I can get into the occasional football or soccer game or tennis match, but I don't plan my weekends around watching sports. &nbsp;But I am from the Baltimore area and I've always had a soft spot in my heart for my hometown teams - the Baltimore Orioles and, since the abandonment by the Colts, the Baltimore Ravens. &nbsp;The Ravens have rarely disappointed, always being in the running throughout the season, but the Orioles have had a couple of bad decades. &nbsp;I grew up in the time of Brooks Robinson, Jim Palmer, Eddie Murray, Cal Ripkin, &nbsp;and a whole host of other players that shined. &nbsp;It has been sad to see the team struggle but I've still always had faith.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">This year, the Orioles have come back and come back strong! &nbsp;They have a bunch of players I've never heard of, but the names are starting to become familiar this year. &nbsp;Last night, they moved in tying for first place. &nbsp;I am going to go see them in what is probably the best ballpark in the U.S. - Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore - today for their last home game. &nbsp;And it is bobblehead day, so I even get a souvenir! &nbsp;Going to go put on some orange and black, very appropriate colors for this cool fall day, and head down to the park to watch the Birds!</span><br /><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-dLlphu4T5XM/UGhQABCq4PI/AAAAAAAAArs/tAGruG1G9C8/s1600/Baltimore_Orioles3.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="150" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-dLlphu4T5XM/UGhQABCq4PI/AAAAAAAAArs/tAGruG1G9C8/s200/Baltimore_Orioles3.jpg" width="200" /></a><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Lk8hLi9BIUM/UTNhVgB53eI/AAAAAAAAADk/37ebxLvV4o8/s1600/ravens_preview_flat.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="154" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Lk8hLi9BIUM/UTNhVgB53eI/AAAAAAAAADk/37ebxLvV4o8/s320/ravens_preview_flat.png" width="320" /></a></div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Addendum: &nbsp;And can I just add that the Baltimore Ravens won the Super Bowl this year! &nbsp;What a year for Baltimore sports fans!</span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-60730853201659106212012-08-23T19:26:00.000-04:002012-08-23T19:26:17.323-04:00Easy Supper<span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Short and sweet. &nbsp;Burgers from the grassfed beef in the freezer, tomatoes from the garden, and some mayo. &nbsp;Add salt and pepper, serve up on a paper plate if you want to avoid cleanup and you have it made.</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-52m4IAjVkwY/UDa7tHaddVI/AAAAAAAAAqw/4UXFpQTbrpc/s1600/IMG_0824.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-52m4IAjVkwY/UDa7tHaddVI/AAAAAAAAAqw/4UXFpQTbrpc/s320/IMG_0824.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-77892383233082341172012-08-08T17:18:00.002-04:002012-10-29T15:30:40.360-04:00Awesome Eats in Portland, Maine and Boston, Mass.<span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;My daughter and I love to travel and discover new places to eat and things to do. &nbsp;We are not so much into the typical touristy things to do, though we have been known to visit typical landmarks and famous places. We don't participate in the usual tours, instead choosing to explore on our own and take advice and suggestions from others who have been to the same places for food and fun places to visit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;This past long weekend, we visited Portland, Maine for the first U.S. stopover of the Mumford &amp; Sons "Gentlemen of the Road" tour. &nbsp;Portland is a great place to visit with beautiful scenery, decent weather (don't be fooled by its northern location - it can be hot, but mostly it was dry and lovely), and a plethora of foodie restaurants and boutique shops. Right up our alley.</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Our first restaurant visit was to&nbsp;<a href="http://duckfat.com/">Duckfat</a>. &nbsp;The name says it all. &nbsp;Their fries are fried in&nbsp;duck fat and served with aioli and other spicy sauces. &nbsp;We shared a large order which was way more than both of us could handle, but so delicious. &nbsp;I also had a cup of a great carrot curry soup and C had a salad with shredded duck. &nbsp;Almost every restaurant we went to in Portland was very familiar with gluten-free requirements, so it was easy to make most meals gluten-free if not full paleo. &nbsp;Duckfat fries may not be paleo to some, but a little potato indulgence is fine with me. &nbsp;I wish I had taken pictures, but alas, the food disappeared before I remembered to take any pics on this trip.</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;The 6000+ influx of people into the Portland area for the Mumford festival flooded the streets during the day and restaurants were a bit hard to get into. &nbsp;We tried to visit The Farmer's Table for brunch, but they were filled to the brim for the rest of the day. &nbsp;We opted for a trip to a small bar/restaurant for dinner that night. &nbsp;I feel bad because I don't even remember the name of it, but they made a killer salmon filet for me with asparagus and more potatoes (potatoes and Maine must go together). &nbsp;C had a shrimp risotto. &nbsp;The only complaint was the cloud of fruit flies that were attracted to our peach margaritas, but overall an enjoyable experience. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;On the night of the festival, the crowds flooded Portland afterwards, looking like zombie hoards looking for victims. &nbsp;C and I decided to go to a quieter location for dinner, having spent the day with the same 6000. &nbsp;We went to <a href="http://www.forestreet.biz/">Fore Street</a>, arriving at almost 11:00 to an almost full house, but seated right away. &nbsp;This place was amazing in a beautiful refurbished old building with rustic brick and wood. &nbsp;The hostess led us past an open kitchen where a staff was hard at work. &nbsp;We were seated next to a candlelit window overlooking the streets of Portland toward the waterfront. &nbsp;We could watch the zombie hoards &nbsp;following the limos, which they hoped contained the members of Mumford and the other bands from the day, who had promised to frequent various venues for the rest of the night. &nbsp;We had a waiter with a full 6 inch beard. C commented that all of these farm-to-table restaurants seemed to have a staff that came straight out of the Daniel Boone era - always with full beards. &nbsp;We shared an appetizer of the freshest raw fish I've ever had - salmon, tuna, scallops, and a white fish, each with its own topping. &nbsp;The scallops and white fish were ceviched. &nbsp;C then had a huge piece of pork belly. &nbsp;I had an even larger pork chop sitting on a bed of sauerkraut. &nbsp;We shared everything. &nbsp;We were happy we did not order vegetables because there was certainly no room. &nbsp;Again, this restaurant was gluten-free friendly and oh-so-paleo.</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;On Sunday, we headed to Boston, a quick two-hour drive. &nbsp;Once again, we did not suffer from lack of choices. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">On Monday, we went to </span><a href="http://neborestaurant.com/" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Nebo</a><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">, winner of a Bobby Flay showdown. &nbsp;We had the most delicious gluten-free pizza (paleo was out the window at this point). &nbsp;This is possibly the most gluten-free friendly place I have ever been. &nbsp;They had a complete two page, small type, menu of gluten free pastas and pizzas. &nbsp;I had the Michael Diavolo pizza - bacon, pepperoni, mozzarella, tomato sauce. &nbsp;Beautifully prepared and delicious. &nbsp;C and her boyfriend had equally tasty variations. &nbsp;She opted for a potato gorgonzola version while he had a custom margherita style. &nbsp;The crusts were wonderful - as far as I am concerned they were as good if not better than most pizza crusts I have had, GF or not.</span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;If that wasn't enough, C and I went to brunch on Tuesday for our last meal in Boston for the week. &nbsp;We went to <a href="http://www.zaftigs.com/">Zaftig's</a>. &nbsp;It is a Jewish delicatessen style restaurant. &nbsp;I had scrambled eggs with beef salami which came with a side of home-fried potatoes and three slices of watermelon topped with strawberries. &nbsp;C had a version of eggs Benedict on GF potato pancakes with more watermelon and berries. &nbsp;We ate well this week and this place just topped it off with deliciousness. &nbsp;What a great finale to a fun week of eating. &nbsp;Oh yeah, we also visited Walden Pond, Boston Commons, saw two movies (Beasts of the Southern Wild and the latest Batman), Castle Island, and of course, shopped Newbury Street several times. &nbsp;Almost forgot chocolate hazelnut cake (all GF) from <a href="http://www.burdickchocolate.com/">L.A. Burdick</a>&nbsp;and iced chocolate. &nbsp;I think I need to go to the gym a lot this week.</span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-49723648910740952502012-07-09T12:55:00.000-04:002012-07-09T13:00:41.343-04:00The OMG Purple Smoothie<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;It's been hot as Hades for almost two weeks now and cooking and eating hot food is just not that appetizing. &nbsp;Today, it is actually a bit cooler, but I saw a recipe for a frozen banana dessert yesterday and I decided to try it out today. &nbsp;Like all my recipes, this one morphed into its own creation. &nbsp;This is not really a paleo recipe but it almost passes primal muster. &nbsp;Who cares? &nbsp;I mean, honestly, what is with all this strict paleo nonsense? &nbsp;When you get to the end of your life, feeling fit and happy from eating a MOSTLY paleo diet, are you going to regret the two months you might have earned by being strict, never-cheating paleo? &nbsp;My guess is you will be spending more of that time regretting not having ever eaten a treat (albeit a real-food one) once in a while. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Back to the recipe. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1. &nbsp;Freeze some bananas overnight. &nbsp;First hint: &nbsp;take the skin off first. &nbsp;I learned the hard way that a frozen banana doesn't peel well. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">2. Break or chop a banana into 2-3 large pieces and place them in a blender. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">3. Then, I added 2 overflowing scoops of the Primal Blueprint's chocolate Primal Fuel protein powder. &nbsp;(I can hear the paleo screams now.) &nbsp;I've had the stuff forever, so I figured I'd use some of it up and the original recipe called for cocoa. &nbsp;You can use powdered cocoa if you want.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">4. &nbsp;Next, I added 2 tablespoons of coconut oil (mine is liquid right now due to the heat).</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">5. &nbsp;The original recipe calls for 2 tbsps Nutella. I just happened to have some, so in it went. I bet you could sub almond butter or some other nut butter and more cocoa.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">6. &nbsp;I started looking around and decided a handful of those recently picked and frozen wild raspberries would liven things up, so in went a large handful.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">7. Feeling guilty that I had been neglecting my greens lately, I added a large handful of spinach leaves.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">7.5. Almost left this out: I also added about a cup of almond milk.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">8. &nbsp;Whir, whir - this lovely purple creation resulted. &nbsp;The taste is amazing. &nbsp;I said "OMG!" as soon as it hit my tastebuds. &nbsp;Really, I did. &nbsp;It's incredible. &nbsp;And it made at least 2-3 servings. Maybe there will be some left for my husband later.</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4G89E1CBOBo/T_sMoIDcvAI/AAAAAAAAAqE/h7C9wlsdTtk/s1600/smoothie.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4G89E1CBOBo/T_sMoIDcvAI/AAAAAAAAAqE/h7C9wlsdTtk/s320/smoothie.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-69487437489248750862012-07-04T09:37:00.000-04:002012-07-04T09:37:10.302-04:00July, July!<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">We've had quite a heat wave here in the eastern U.S., but in our little corner of southeastern PA, the humidity levels have been low and we average about 5-10 degrees cooler than the Baltimore Metro area on any given day. &nbsp;My raised beds are doing well with only one cucumber plant casualty. I'll have to keep an eye out for those pesky squash bugs since I suspect they might be the culprit. &nbsp;My ten new Redstar hens and my three older Buff Orpington girls, and my Brahma and Buff roosters (best buddies, by the way) do a decent job of culling bugs from the gardens. &nbsp;They are a bit distracted right now by the Green June Beetles who are very large and make sweeping flyovers close to the lawn. &nbsp;The chickens think it is great sport tracking them down and make a very satisfied cackle when they catch one and gulp it down. &nbsp;They have also discovered my porch and back patio are great places to chill when they need a rest. &nbsp;</span><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I went out yesterday and weeded the beds. Raised beds make this so easy since the dirt never gets packed down and the weeds usually pull out very easily. &nbsp;I noticed crabgrass making an appearance already this year which can be a bit tougher to pull out. &nbsp;Everything is earlier by 2-3 weeks. &nbsp;I dug out the rest of the potatoes which are done almost a month ahead of time and pulled about half the onions. &nbsp;Tomatoes are still green but we should have red and yellow ripe ones in a few days. &nbsp;I watered the beds with rainwater collected in the rain barrel that my husband gave me as a Christmas present this year. &nbsp;It has come in handy because, despite the frequent thunderings, we have had little rain. I'll finish up with a picture of the day's haul. &nbsp;I love going out with my basket and collecting whatever is ripe that day and planning meals around it. &nbsp;Yesterday, we had zucchini, white potatoes, onions, and hot peppers stir fried in lard. &nbsp;Ahhh, summer.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Jpot_y5YEBU/T_RGb4BJSrI/AAAAAAAAAp4/6tcXzIjQLLw/s1600/IMG_0738.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="300" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Jpot_y5YEBU/T_RGb4BJSrI/AAAAAAAAAp4/6tcXzIjQLLw/s400/IMG_0738.jpg" width="400" /></a></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div></div>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-12384074038574265552012-06-14T19:57:00.000-04:002012-06-14T20:01:31.415-04:00One year later...<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;I started strength training one year ago this month at McKenna's Gym. &nbsp;When I started, the 15 kg women's bar seemed so heavy I could barely lift it from its rack. &nbsp;My first back squats were painful literally and figuratively. &nbsp;I was certain I had crushed several vertebrae in my neck that first session. &nbsp;Every joint and muscle let me know the next day that I had gone far too long without true exercise. &nbsp; But thanks to my daughter, who went with me for the summer sessions, a group of women regulars who are always encouraging, and Mike, the owner/trainer, who quietly and inexhaustibly corrects, cajoles, consoles, and repeats the numbers of sets and reps for those of us who never seem to listen the first time, I've stuck with it an entire year and have no intentions of stopping.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;I stopped weighing myself about four years ago because of the head games a number can play with your mind. &nbsp;I burned the scale in our burn ring in our garden area and felt guilty as I did so. &nbsp;I felt guilty about burning a scale! &nbsp;How can an object like that hold so much power? Burning that scale was cathartic. &nbsp;My worth is not based on how much I weigh - it never was and intellectually I knew that - &nbsp;but society's judgement is still hard to live with. I also went gluten-free that same year which set me back on the path of eating real food, which led me to research on paleolithic eating, which got my health to a place where I feel better now than I have felt for 40 years, maybe even my entire life. &nbsp;Strength training was the capstone piece that pulled it all together.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Two years ago, my neighbor, whom I have known for 24 years, told me one day that she was lifting weights and that I should join her. &nbsp;What, really? &nbsp;I only knew men who had lifted weights and was only aware of professional women body builders who did not really look like I wanted to look. Nothing wrong with how they look, but it wasn't for me. &nbsp;The last regular gym I belonged to discouraged women from using free weights and directed us to the machines and light dumbbells. &nbsp;"No grunting or dropping weights allowed please." I was skeptical of my friend's request, but could see the improvement in her confidence as well as her body. &nbsp;The location was about 1.5 miles from my house, so I had no excuse there. &nbsp;It took me a year to finally get up the nerve to contact Mike. &nbsp;I dragged my daughter along for backup and I've been going regularly (2-3 days per week for 1 hour sessions) ever since. &nbsp; There are a lot of reasons why. &nbsp;Mike is an awesome olympic weightlifting coach and trainer. &nbsp;He also writes a weightlifting blog with references to Shakespeare, has an equally awesome family, likes a variety of music and good food, and can carry on a conversation about most subjects. &nbsp;The women of the gym are also amazing. &nbsp;Mike said once we were a community and that is an apt description. &nbsp;We do our weightlifting and conditioning but we talk about our day, our families, our disappointments, and our celebrations because that is what women do. &nbsp;We are quiet when we need to be. &nbsp;We bitch about turkish get-ups, pulling the sled, and jumping rope, and we encourage each other good-naturedly with a nod, a "Yes," or perhaps a consoling roll of the eyes. We help each other put weights on and off the bar. &nbsp;We encourage the new person as much as the heavy lifter. &nbsp;It is a community.</span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-SDHUDUbZV3E/T9p53ShKFUI/AAAAAAAAAps/NMF_dRKpnRg/s1600/yorkbarbell.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="255" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-SDHUDUbZV3E/T9p53ShKFUI/AAAAAAAAAps/NMF_dRKpnRg/s320/yorkbarbell.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">If you've driven up I83 in Pennsylvania, you've seen this guy.</td></tr></tbody></table><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;I went through a lot of changes over this past year. &nbsp;Outwardly my body changed. &nbsp;I lost inches and I think weight (though I can only guess based on clothing sizes which decreased two full pant sizes). &nbsp;I know I lost 2.5 inches of fat from my waist. &nbsp;That is important to me because I know that belly fat indicates metabolic problems and it literally disappeared even though my paleo-based diet has remained pretty steady. &nbsp;I also went through a 6-9 month period of time when one joint would act up - a wrist, an elbow, a shoulder, a knee, an ankle, maybe some back pain. &nbsp;I'm not really sure what was going on here but it worked its way around my body from right to left. &nbsp;Cleaning up the diet helped (dairy is not my friend) but &nbsp;I feel much more balanced now and I think that is what was happening. &nbsp;As muscles strengthened, they pulled on tendons and joints, causing some pain, but eventually it all just balanced out.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;I've always been a fairly confident person, but I feel much more confident now. &nbsp;I like the muscles that are now defined. &nbsp;I like the greater flexibility and strength. &nbsp;I like that I can lift a pretty darn good bit of weight. &nbsp;I'll finish up with some PR numbers for the past year. &nbsp;I started keeping track last August but I started with an empty 15 kg bar.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Back squat - 80 kg</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Front squat - 60 kg</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Snatch - 30 kg (my most difficult form challenge)</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Clean - 42 kg</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Press - 40 kg</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;I'm happy and looking forward to another year.</span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-77217462515580030942012-06-03T16:36:00.003-04:002012-06-03T16:38:06.838-04:00It is full summer now, the heart of June<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Not quite the heart of June, Oscar Wilde, but my garden is so early this year that it seems so. &nbsp;A quick once over of the garden produced a basketful of just-picked goodness, best expressed in pictures:</span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YGMzJPYilGw/T8vJvUMT8fI/AAAAAAAAAo4/4cOdWfAt2T0/s1600/IMG_0624.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YGMzJPYilGw/T8vJvUMT8fI/AAAAAAAAAo4/4cOdWfAt2T0/s320/IMG_0624.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Snow peas ready to blanch and freeze.</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-sdYsfqHQf3Q/T8vJwoeBt8I/AAAAAAAAApA/B2CQyRNncNM/s1600/IMG_0625.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-sdYsfqHQf3Q/T8vJwoeBt8I/AAAAAAAAApA/B2CQyRNncNM/s320/IMG_0625.jpg" width="240" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Lettuce for tonight's dinner.</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Ix5b34dQsMo/T8vJxfHFq9I/AAAAAAAAApI/PXIYjQPcslA/s1600/IMG_0626.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Ix5b34dQsMo/T8vJxfHFq9I/AAAAAAAAApI/PXIYjQPcslA/s320/IMG_0626.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">New potatoes (the white one infiltrated the red line). &nbsp;Unfortunately, the potatoes are being hit with fusarium wilt, probably brought in on the "organic" seed potatoes - one of the side effects of buying untreated seed. &nbsp;I got a good crop before the wilt set in. &nbsp;The white potatoes in the next row seem to be doing fine.</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-K5whQQ5tuQk/T8vJyTAUOOI/AAAAAAAAApQ/os9qyEdL24Q/s1600/IMG_0627.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-K5whQQ5tuQk/T8vJyTAUOOI/AAAAAAAAApQ/os9qyEdL24Q/s320/IMG_0627.jpg" width="240" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Parsley, sage, thyme, dill, fennel, cilantro, basil.</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VAK-ndOalLs/T8vJzZWIP1I/AAAAAAAAApY/y9Q2YTeiVbk/s1600/IMG_0628.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VAK-ndOalLs/T8vJzZWIP1I/AAAAAAAAApY/y9Q2YTeiVbk/s320/IMG_0628.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">The daily cache of strawberries. &nbsp;They've had a tough spring with high heat and torrential downpours but are hanging in there.</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ubcn2tv318c/T8vJ05NwlgI/AAAAAAAAApg/V9hEQ7cmv9E/s1600/IMG_0629.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ubcn2tv318c/T8vJ05NwlgI/AAAAAAAAApg/V9hEQ7cmv9E/s320/IMG_0629.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Snow peas ready to go into the freezer for winter use. &nbsp;There are tons left on the vines!</td></tr></tbody></table><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-76395623801828234162012-05-22T20:56:00.000-04:002012-05-22T20:57:26.113-04:00A Simple Salad<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">This is a just a simple salad. &nbsp;Fresh greens from the garden - &nbsp;so early this year. &nbsp;Some surprisingly tasty tomatoes from the local grocery store. &nbsp;One perfectly ripe avocado. &nbsp;Several slices of local bacon. &nbsp;A dollop of Wilderness Family Mayo. &nbsp;Simple paleo perfection.</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/--M0fkIoPE1M/T7w1WEY3rqI/AAAAAAAAAos/aYAgUpGZCYk/s1600/salad.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="588" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/--M0fkIoPE1M/T7w1WEY3rqI/AAAAAAAAAos/aYAgUpGZCYk/s640/salad.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-43593442218553156492012-04-30T20:48:00.004-04:002012-04-30T20:49:44.285-04:00Bachickage.<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Starting May Day, I am using recipes generated by Chris Kresser's Meal Plan Generator and using his Personal Paleo Code to dial in a stricter paleo diet. &nbsp;You can select which ingredients you want to exclude with the meal plan generator or use a canned plan or both. &nbsp;I chose a 30-Day Reset (paleo with no dairy, rice, buckwheat, or concentrated sweeteners) &nbsp;and I also deleted nightshades. &nbsp;The plan also generates a shopping list and my fridge is full of fresh vegetables from my weekend shopping trip. &nbsp;I've already got a freezer full of beef, chicken, pork, and lamb. After the initial 30 days, you gradually add in some of the removed items, like dairy, and see if there are reactions to any of them. &nbsp;The obvious non-paleo foods like vegetable oils, gluten and most other grains, and processed foods are never used or reintroduced. &nbsp;I'm doing this because I want to see if the annoying migrating joint pains I am getting are just from weightlifting or have some other cause.</span><br /><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;I've been easing into it over the weekend trying out a couple of the recipes which are culled from all the best paleo sources, including some of Chris' own recipes. &nbsp;So far, they have been excellent, bringing in rave reviews from the family. &nbsp;Saturday night we had a version of sole meuniere (as usual I adulterated it by using haddock and coating with almond chips instead of almond flour) with a side of fried plantains and some asparagus soup. &nbsp;Last night we had Curried Beef Stew with Coconut Milk with a dessert of strawberries drizzled with balsamic vinegar and coconut milk and a sprinkle of black pepper. &nbsp;They were amazing. &nbsp;Tonight, we had what my husband called "bachickage" - bacon-wrapped chicken surrounding sausage - with a side of brussel sprouts with some more bacon. &nbsp;</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;My only complaint so far is that I cannot make gourmet meals several times a day. &nbsp;There is no way I am going to be able to recreate this generated menu for one day:&nbsp;</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; color: #333333; font-family: Spinnaker; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;">Bratwurst and German</span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; color: #333333; font-family: Spinnaker; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;">Curried Beef Stew with Coconut Milk</span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; color: #333333; font-family: Spinnaker; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;">Mahi Mahi with Gingered Carrots</span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; color: #333333; font-family: Spinnaker; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;">Thyme-Braised Brussels Sprouts</span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; color: #333333; font-family: Spinnaker; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;">Crispy Shiitake Mushroom Chips</span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; color: #333333; font-family: Spinnaker; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;">Easy Paleo Ice Cream</span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: collapse; color: #333333; font-family: Spinnaker; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;"><br /></span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">So I've decided to pick and choose from the menus provided, building in leftovers from the previous dinner for lunch and simplifying breakfast. &nbsp;Rough life, this paleo. &nbsp;I'll keep you posted. &nbsp;It is still April 30th so I am going to enjoy my last gluten free cookie for the next 30 days (and maybe longer).</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jZuc8iMC9YE/T58xLDDskiI/AAAAAAAAAoU/UPkWEVCUDWA/s1600/IMG_0604.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jZuc8iMC9YE/T58xLDDskiI/AAAAAAAAAoU/UPkWEVCUDWA/s320/IMG_0604.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-39812202674667819512012-04-23T20:32:00.002-04:002012-04-23T20:33:36.816-04:00Gluten-free Not-So-Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies That Don't Taste Like Crap<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;These cookies are not paleo or primal or very low carb. &nbsp;They are gluten-free. &nbsp;When I first started eating gluten-free, I went through a period of eating gluten-free substitutes. &nbsp;I probably ate every godawful gluten-free product out there, wasting a ton of money on stuff that tasted horrible and had a carb/calorie count through the roof. &nbsp;I did find a few that I like that I keep around in case I want a certain taste - Udi's bread for the occasional toast, Tinkyada pasta for the rare pasta dish (I now like zucchini better), and maybe some GF crackers once in a while. &nbsp;But I don't buy or eat them often. &nbsp;I also bought just about every GF flour back in the day, trying in vain to reproduce an edible bread or cake. &nbsp;Almost all were terrible and probably three times the cost of regular baked products and were full of alternate grains or bean flours. &nbsp;I probably wasted hundreds of dollars. &nbsp;Finally, I realized that I would never completely recreate the tastes of non-GF foods and, with the exception of the short list above, I don't bother with GF products much anymore. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;I see the same trend happening in the paleo/primal community. &nbsp;I have several paleo cookbooks that attempt to recreate cookies or cakes or some other "treat" by subbing stevia (blech) or eliminating the sugar entirely or subbing honey or maple syrup. &nbsp;Maple syrup is supposed to contain a bit more glucose than fructose, but it imparts a maple flavor that I just don't enjoy in my desserts. &nbsp;Same with honey and it generally has a higher fructose content than I like. &nbsp;Some use coconut flour which for some reason (FODMAPS?) gives me stomach cramps every time I eat it. &nbsp;Coconut oil is OK, but it imparts a slight coconut taste to baked goods that, again, I just don't enjoy. &nbsp;So my new motto is this: &nbsp;A foray into the dessert world is fine on occasion but I want the same flavor that I am used to - no weirdly tasting sub-par dessert if I am going to waste some calories or carbs (which I don't count anyway) on it. &nbsp;One caveat though - they will always be GF - the repercussions of non-GF food on my system is not good and never worth it.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;For several years, I have tried to reproduce an GF chocolate chip cookie that tastes and has the consistency of those my mother, who was an amazing baker, made. &nbsp;I've had some success with taste, but the texture was never quite right. &nbsp;GF cookies tend to be soft or crumbly, especially the next day. &nbsp;Last night, I tried again. ( I am embarking on a Personal Paleo Code/ala Chris Kresser adventure starting May 1st, and I thought I might indulge this last week in April.) My favorite cookie flour is Honeyville Blanched Almond so I started with the recipe on the back of the bag that is based on Elana's Pantry recipe. &nbsp;But as usual, I am never satisfied with a recipe as it stands and I thought to change it up a bit. &nbsp;My recipe has real sugar (because honey and syrup make cookies too moist and soft and because agave syrup is just nasty fructose-laden junk). &nbsp;It's only 1/2 cup of real sugar for 20 very large cookies, so that is 1/40 of a cup per cookie - I doubt it will kill me. &nbsp;It has real Nestle semisweet chocolate chips (1/20 of a cup per cookie), so a bit more sugar comes from those. &nbsp;But, and this is a big BUT, the sugar improves the texture immensely. &nbsp;The edges brown a bit and get just a bit crunchy, while the middle stays chewy with just a bit of "bite" to it. &nbsp;That is what I'm looking for. &nbsp;I also used butter instead of grape seed oil (again, blech). &nbsp;And finally, I added an egg because every recipe in my mother's old recipe book for cookies contain eggs. &nbsp;The dough without the egg was crumbly and grainy. &nbsp;WIth the egg, it turned into a lovely cookie dough reminiscent of my mother's. &nbsp;Here's the recipe. &nbsp;It's not paleo or primal or low carb, but it is gluten-free. &nbsp;And it is delicious. &nbsp;And it is a special treat that fits into my paleo/primal world once in a while.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><b>Gluten-free Not-So-Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies That Don't Taste Like Crap</b></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Mix dry ingredients:</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">2 1/4 cups almond flour (Honeyville is best, hands down)</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1 tsp baking soda</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/2 tsp salt</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Mix wet ingredients:</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/2 cup sugar with 1 tbsp water (or just enough to moisten the sugar to the consistency of honey)</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1 tsp vanilla</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1 egg</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/3 cup melted butter</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Blend wet and dry ingredients thoroughly. &nbsp;Add 1 cup chocolate chips.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Use an ice cream scoop or large melon baller to scoop out generous portions of dough onto a cookie sheet. &nbsp;Flatten the cookies to about 1/3 to 1/4 inch thick with your hand. &nbsp;They will not spread much on their own if at all. &nbsp;Bake at 325 until the edges are lightly browned and the middles are not mushy. &nbsp;Cool and enjoy! &nbsp;I stored these in a cookie can and the next day they were just as good. &nbsp;Here's a picture - they are as good as they look, maybe better!</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-LICNOJjnb2s/T5Xy9fFlAUI/AAAAAAAAAoM/86xpYcKekOc/s1600/IMG_0602.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="300" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-LICNOJjnb2s/T5Xy9fFlAUI/AAAAAAAAAoM/86xpYcKekOc/s400/IMG_0602.jpg" width="400" /></a></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-19290699034899663892012-04-12T19:25:00.000-04:002012-04-12T19:25:30.536-04:00Enough Meat?<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I had to buy a new freezer this past week to accommodate the half of a grassfed (start-to-finish) steer we bought from our local farmer, in addition to what was left of the whole pastured pig we bought last October. &nbsp;Throw in about 30 packs of pet burger from US Wellness Meats, some assorted lamb and chicken parts, and a few other odds and ends, and it didn't take long to fill up the new one. &nbsp;The cost of buying meat this way, direct from a local farmer and the local butcher he uses, is far less than even the regular CAFO meat from the store and so much tastier. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">My last freezer, which we purchased many years ago for $99, was a small chest freezer and I cursed it every time I had to dig deep to find an item I knew was in there somewhere. &nbsp;The new one is an upright and though they are supposedly less efficient and have less usable room per square foot, the convenience of actually being able to see what I have in there is worth it. &nbsp;Plus, it is frost free, which is also a major convenience. &nbsp;So do we have enough meat for the coming year? See below. There is even a heart, a tongue, and some liver in there. &nbsp;I'll get brave enough to fix those one of these days.</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xfn7Cz6MFKI/T4djhZVgGDI/AAAAAAAAAnU/LK5LZQ72r54/s1600/IMG_0596.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xfn7Cz6MFKI/T4djhZVgGDI/AAAAAAAAAnU/LK5LZQ72r54/s320/IMG_0596.jpg" width="240" /></a></div>&nbsp;<a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Vdj6YtH7Ppc/T4djmkmT44I/AAAAAAAAAnc/CGP4kgGGLTk/s1600/IMG_0597.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Vdj6YtH7Ppc/T4djmkmT44I/AAAAAAAAAnc/CGP4kgGGLTk/s320/IMG_0597.jpg" width="240" /></a><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-52799103225934961042012-04-02T20:16:00.000-04:002012-04-02T20:16:07.062-04:00Ribs and Smoky Paprika Bok Choy<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Hey everybody! &nbsp;I've been absent for a while - just needed a break from weekly blogging and it was getting hard to come up with new combinations in the last vestiges of winter. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Tonight's easy dinner was a rack of ribs from the happy pig and a head of bok choy frizzled with onion, garlic, and the key ingredient: &nbsp;smoky paprika. &nbsp; I like ribs dry-rubbed, so I just rubbed them with a spicy mix (you could pretty much do anything here - it all tastes good on ribs). &nbsp;Popped those in the oven at 350 for about an hour. &nbsp;Not tough at all - these ribs are from a pastured pig who never saw the inside of a building and lived his life happily wagging his little corkscrew tail as he rooted around outside for food. &nbsp;The fat created by those ideal conditions enables the meat to remain unbelievably tender. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">As it was cooking, I chopped an onion, the head of bok choy, and some garlic. &nbsp;I sauteed the onion and garlic in some lard from same said pig, added the stalk parts of the bok choy, then the leafy greens, then sprinkled about 2 tsp of smoky paprika over the whole thing. &nbsp;That was the ticket. &nbsp;I like bok choy almost any way, but the paprika added a wonderful flavor and color to the dish.</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WpRRkori6Ek/T3pBKDhQuWI/AAAAAAAAAnM/HIvCd8jukRc/s1600/ribsbokchoy.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WpRRkori6Ek/T3pBKDhQuWI/AAAAAAAAAnM/HIvCd8jukRc/s320/ribsbokchoy.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-1046343069846195232012-03-31T11:27:00.000-04:002012-03-31T11:27:57.802-04:00Go Read This...<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: large;">This is a beautiful piece of work. &nbsp;<a href="http://www.stumptuous.com/rant-64-april-2012-the-house-that-stump-built/comment-page-1#comment-7836">stumptuous.com rant</a></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-3592943689462664722012-03-07T20:06:00.002-05:002012-03-07T20:09:57.949-05:00Pork, Bean, and Butternut Squash Chowder<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">What?! &nbsp;Beans?! &nbsp;Those are not paleo! &nbsp;Yeah, well, these were canned organic cannelini beans that were already presoaked, then I soaked them for several more hours, changing the water several times. &nbsp;I don't think there were too many of those nasty phytates or lectins left. &nbsp;This was an experiment of sorts because I have gotten migraines from beans in the past. &nbsp;I was hoping the double soaking would have the desired effect of removing the offending toxins.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I had made pork chops the night before and had three large chops left over (I purposely made extra to use later in the week). &nbsp;I also had a butternut squash sitting on the counter that was looking at me with soulful eyes wondering why I was not using it. &nbsp;Well, not really, but you know what I mean. &nbsp;So, I googled pork, beans, and butternut squash and Hispanic Kitchen provided me with this wonderful recipe:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.hispanickitchen.com/profiles/blogs/pork-bean-and-butternut-squash-chowder">Pork, Bean and Butternut Squash Chowder</a>.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">They started with uncooked pork, but the already cooked pork worked fine and became very tender. &nbsp;Here's my result:</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-nauW6dOC8WQ/T1gE_qho9mI/AAAAAAAAAnE/73Nh5fAzrwo/s1600/IMG_0581.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-nauW6dOC8WQ/T1gE_qho9mI/AAAAAAAAAnE/73Nh5fAzrwo/s320/IMG_0581.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">It was amazing and I had enough leftover for work lunches for a couple of days and, the best part, no migraines. &nbsp;Enjoy! And check out Hispanic Kitchen - this is not your usual tex-mex site. &nbsp;</span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-53518766648901403832012-02-29T19:27:00.000-05:002012-02-29T19:27:31.222-05:00Salmon with Roasted Brussel Sprouts and Bacon<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">This was such an easy dinner to make that I almost feel guilty posting about it. &nbsp;I bought a lovely piece of wild Pacific salmon from Wegman's, big enough for the three of us. &nbsp;I had some nice brussel sprouts and of course, I always have a load of bacon from our "happy pig" purchase stored in the freezer. &nbsp;M</span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">y daughter quartered the brussel sprouts, chopped the bacon, and cut a new potato into small pieces. &nbsp;Those went in the oven on a flat baking sheet sprinkled with some olive oil, salt, and pepper.</span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;After they cooked a bit, I seared the salmon skin-side down in frying pan. &nbsp; As the sprouts cooked and the salmon skin seared, I melted some butter, added some lemon juice, and sliced up a lemon. &nbsp;I placed those on top of the salmon and finished it up in the oven with the sprouts. &nbsp; (You will want to time this so they both finish at the same time). &nbsp;Is there anything better than roasted brussel sprouts? &nbsp;For years, I steamed or boiled them - what a waste!&nbsp;</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QttAlbSAYdE/T07A7Tl2eHI/AAAAAAAAAm8/RSoUZCfxNy0/s1600/IMG_0575.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QttAlbSAYdE/T07A7Tl2eHI/AAAAAAAAAm8/RSoUZCfxNy0/s320/IMG_0575.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-34778083798671193562012-02-22T17:14:00.000-05:002012-02-22T17:14:21.580-05:00Spicy Sausage and Apples<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I had to laugh a couple of days ago when I found that someone had pinned a photo of my Spicy Cauliflower Soup on Pinterest and said it was a bit bland. &nbsp;I found it funny since we have a very high tolerance for spicy foods in this household and that recipe is relatively spicy. &nbsp;The problem is that if your spices are old or perhaps just a mild version, it is hard to predict what level of spiciness you might achieve in your own dish. &nbsp;The curry that I have here (Penzey's) is a nice peppy version and the same can be said for the red pepper flakes. &nbsp;I guess I will need to add a caveat to each recipe saying your spiciness may vary. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">At any rate, this dish is not what I would call spicy, though you can certainly make it that way with the judicious use of some cayenne or red pepper or even hot sausage. &nbsp;It is a very easy dish to make and can be whipped up quickly after a hard evening at the gym. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Slice about a pound of sausage (hot italian or plain) into bite sized pieces. &nbsp; Peel and chop a couple of apples into similar sizes. &nbsp;Dice an onion. &nbsp;Add a small amount of coconut oil or lard to a shallow pan. &nbsp;Fry onions until softened. &nbsp;Add the sausage and cook most of the way through. &nbsp;Add the apples, a pinch (or two or three) of cayenne and cinnamon. &nbsp; Salt and pepper to taste. &nbsp; Cook until sausage is done. &nbsp;Serve. &nbsp;How easy is that?</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-baYXptyvdTE/T0VnvwR4uaI/AAAAAAAAAmk/YCmVRbCPUDM/s1600/IMG_0571.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-baYXptyvdTE/T0VnvwR4uaI/AAAAAAAAAmk/YCmVRbCPUDM/s320/IMG_0571.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-68512814724889947212012-02-16T19:12:00.000-05:002012-02-16T19:12:31.942-05:00A Barely Sweet Treat - Cranberry Citrus Muffins<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">These are treats. &nbsp;Not terribly paleo, but they are made with mostly almond flour and good ingredients and a mere 1/2 cup of sugar for 12 muffins. &nbsp;I think I can live with that. &nbsp;They turned out moist and delicious. The citrus additions add just enough sweetness to counteract the pop of the tart cranberries in your mouth. &nbsp;</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Cvyx0vq4OQw/Tz2atbgFIEI/AAAAAAAAAmU/u-uM_FxYtEQ/s1600/IMG_0570.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Cvyx0vq4OQw/Tz2atbgFIEI/AAAAAAAAAmU/u-uM_FxYtEQ/s320/IMG_0570.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: #333333; font-family: 'lucida grande', tahoma, verdana, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; line-height: 14px;">‎</span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: #333333; line-height: 14px;">1 cup gluten-free flour (I used Pamela's but you could experiment with all almond)<br />1 1/2 cups almond flour (you could experiment with more almond flour and baking powder)<br />1/2 cup granulated sugar<br />1 Tablespoon grated orange peel<br />2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder<br />1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum (I use psyllium powder which works the same way or you could leave both out)<br />1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin powder<br />1 teaspoon salt<br />1 cup citrus juice (I used a mix of orange, lemon, lime)<br />2 large eggs<br />1/4 cup butter, melted (or coconut oil)<br />1 to 2 cups whole cranberries<br /><br />Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a non-stick muffin pan or use liners.<br />Combine dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Mix in the juice, eggs, butter; Blend until thoroughly moistened. Mixture is thick. Fold in cranberries. Spoon batter into muffin cups. Fill to the top. Makes 12 muffins. Bake for 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool slightly. EAT!</span></span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-32535692429851404072012-02-04T10:30:00.002-05:002012-02-04T11:21:53.801-05:00First Amendment Rights - There is No Money in Getting People Well<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Read this: &nbsp;<a href="http://www.janssushibar.com/?p=13138&amp;utm_source=rss&amp;utm_medium=rss&amp;utm_campaign=disclaiming">Janssushibar disclaimer</a></span><br /><div><br /></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">and this: &nbsp;<a href="http://freetheanimal.com/2012/02/whos-the-worstest-of-them-all.html">Free the Animal - Who's the Worstest?</a></span></div><div><br /></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">and this: &nbsp;<a href="http://freetheanimal.com/2012/02/clear-thinking-drawing-distinctions-and-north-carolina-board-of-dieteticsnutrition-vs-steve-cooksey-diabetes-warrior.html">Free the Animal - Clear Thinking...</a></span></div><div><br /></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">and this: &nbsp;<a href="http://livinlavidalowcarb.com/blog/the-llvlc-show-episode-539-steve-cookseys-rd-sabotage-saga-and-carolyn-rush-helps-you-eat-primal-on-a-budget/13057">Jimmy Moore</a></span></div><div><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">and this:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.midwestprs.com/diabetes-warriors-steve-cooksey-and-the-future-of-low-carb-diets">diabetes-warriors-steve-cooksey-and-the-future-of-low-carb-diets</a></span><br /><br /></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">These bloggers and more have written about the North Carolina's Board of Dieticians' "review" of Steve Cooksey's blog and what the NCBD perceives as his giving advice and counseling about diabetes contrary to the crap advice they give their clients. &nbsp;They are threatening to take action against him if he continues to blog about his experience of controlling diabetes with diet. &nbsp;Steve has found a way to use a paleo lifestyle to virtually cure his diabetes. &nbsp;This upsets the NCBD since they prescribe the usual American Diabetes Association advice that keeps people sick with insulin, drugs, and a diet plan that makes even healthy people sick. &nbsp;Several states have pending legislation that would block anyone who is not a licensed dietician or physician from giving health advice. &nbsp;Seems like someone is feeling threatened. First amendment rights anyone? &nbsp; &nbsp;<b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: large;">There is no money in getting people well.</span></b></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Here is Steve's blog: <a href="http://www.diabetes-warrior.net/">http://www.diabetes-warrior.net/</a></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;If I ever develop diabetes, I know who I will go to for advice.</span></div>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com3tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-38667163398750683032012-01-16T14:36:00.000-05:002012-01-16T14:36:40.407-05:00About Paleo Challenges...<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">It is the time of year for resolutions. &nbsp;Primal and paleo challenges abound on the internet. &nbsp;Facebook paleo groups are resounding with "I'm in!" only to be followed a couple of weeks later with "I can't do this. I'm quitting. &nbsp;I've failed. What am I doing wrong?" &nbsp;We've all been there. &nbsp;I even have a few attempts on my blog at starting some 30-day challenges only to get tired of updating my blog each day and facing the fact that I wasn't strict paleo once again.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I don't think there is anything inherently wrong with a paleo challenge. &nbsp;Maybe it is the impetus someone needs to clean out the pantry of non-paleo temptations. Maybe it will spark someone to at least try the paleo lifestyle for the first time. &nbsp;My problem is with the all-or-nothing attitude of some proponents of these challenges. &nbsp;I think this becomes a setup for failure. &nbsp;Way too many of us who have dieted in the past know the thoughts that begin in your head as soon as you slip off the proverbial bandwagon. &nbsp;"I blew today so I might as well start over tomorrow." &nbsp;The same thing happens tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow and eventually you find yourself posting that you are quitting the challenge on Facebook and you feel like the ultimate failure. &nbsp;I've seen numerous posts like this already and it saddens me.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">How about a different kind of challenge? &nbsp;What if you try to eat as paleo as possible while living in the real world of work and family where you don't have hours to prepare paleo meals? As a teacher, I get 22 minutes to eat lunch and I share a microwave with 12 co-workers in my department. &nbsp;I am not at home running my paleo consulting business where I can shut off my computer for an hour or take a break from exercising while I prepare a hot lunch. &nbsp;What if you try to make each day just a little more paleo? &nbsp;What if you forgive yourself for eating a pat of butter from grassfed cows or having a damn potato or a piece of cheese once in a while? What if you experiment a bit and find out what works best for you instead of listening to someone you've never met tell you what worked for them? &nbsp;What if you devise a paleo lifestyle that works for you and your life and makes YOU feel and perform better?</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I might get some flack for this. But in the last few years, I have found a place in paleo that makes me feel good and yet allows me to live a non-spartan lifestyle. &nbsp;I could go the strict paleo route and never eat dairy, potatoes, sugar, coffee, or non-pastured meats again and maybe that will get me an extra year or so added to my life. &nbsp;But I think I have attained a fairly happy medium where I eat paleo a good bit of the time but I still have room in my life for the occasional french fry, gluten-free baked good, tortilla chip, or piece of chocolate. I'm not willing to trade that for the tiny little bit of improvement I might get from being strict paleo. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">What I do know is this: &nbsp;Nearly all of the improvements in my health can be attributed to two things. &nbsp;First, gluten has no place in my life. &nbsp;I would guess that 90% of my health improvements came from eliminating that little monster from my diet. &nbsp;That is my area of strictness - no gluten, ever. &nbsp;The second major contributor to improved health comes from strength training. &nbsp;For a minimal investment of 2-3 hours per week of weightlifting (the olympic kind), other strength and conditioning work (Tabata drills, kettle bell, ropes, etc), and just general activity, I am fitter now than I have been since my late teens. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">In addition to those two things, I don't use a lot of dairy products, but I do have cheese (the real kind) and I add milk or cream to my coffee. &nbsp;I limit coffee to one cup per day because it makes me jittery. &nbsp;I buy pastured meat (beef, pork, chicken, lamb) from local farmers or US Wellness Meats. &nbsp;I raise my own chickens for a supply of eggs (or buy local pastured eggs when my hens decide not to lay). &nbsp;If I buy cheese, it is the good stuff, preferably from raw milk and I usually purchase raw milk/cream for coffee and cooking. &nbsp;I EAT BACON - it is from the pastured pork and is probably full of nitrites but I can't foresee a life without bacon. &nbsp;I raise many of my own vegetables during the summer and I buy as good a quality as I can during the winter and try to buy in-season and local as much as possible. &nbsp;For my sanity, I have a supply of dark chocolate on hand and I make the occasional gluten-free dessert, like cupcakes for my birthday. &nbsp;I don't want to eat a paleoized version of these, most of which taste like crap. &nbsp;I do not intentionally eat vegetable oils, except when I eat at a restaurant that uses them. I feel like my body can handle that abomination for the infrequent times I eat out. &nbsp;A lifetime without potatoes? &nbsp;Can't do it - again I feel like my body can handle the occasional potato assault without too much damage.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">If you've followed me this far, then some of you are tsk-tsking away at me and saying I am not eating paleo at all. &nbsp;Whatever. &nbsp;The point is I eat better than probably 99% of the people on the planet, I am getting good results from eating this way, and I am keeping my sanity while doing it. My lab tests (for what they're worth) show constant improvement. &nbsp;When it stops working for me, I'll have to look at getting stricter, but for now I am a happy paleo camper. &nbsp; For me, eliminating gluten-free grains (and most grains for that matter) and almost all processed foods have made the biggest improvement. &nbsp;For others, it might be eliminating vegetable oils, or sugar, or nightshades, or coffee. &nbsp;Find out what gives you the biggest bang for your paleo buck and work on that item first. &nbsp;The rest is just gravy (albeit gluten-free).</span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com4tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-48504926394754268042012-01-13T18:41:00.000-05:002012-01-13T18:41:52.995-05:00Bacon and Brussel Sprout Bake<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Honestly, you could put bacon on yesterday's newspaper and it would taste good. &nbsp;Some people don't like brussel sprouts (I don't understand) but I bet most people would like them fixed this way. You'll need:</span><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1 quart fresh brussel sprouts</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">coconut oil, lard, or tallow</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">fresh spinach</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">cooked, pulled chicken</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">1/2 pound bacon, preferably pasture-raised</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">seasoning</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Clean and quarter the brussel sprouts. &nbsp;Brush a shallow baking or sheet pan with a light layer of coconut oil, lard, or tallow. &nbsp;Layer the sprouts on top. &nbsp;Cover with a layer of fresh spinach leaves. &nbsp;For the third layer, add the cooked chicken. &nbsp;Top with chopped bacon. &nbsp;Sprinkle the top with whatever seasoning you like. &nbsp;I used a blend of paprika, a bit of chili powder, pepper, and some other spices. &nbsp;Bake at 375 until bacon on top is crispy. Oh my, the bacon drips down to the sprouts and they get crispy leaves on the bottom but are just soft on the inside, the chicken becomes infused with smoky bacon taste, the spinach leaves wilt just so slightly. &nbsp;Ah.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-m7bl5WRrHwU/TxDAGP0pH9I/AAAAAAAAAmM/ftSTAqPqKXs/s1600/IMG_0556.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-m7bl5WRrHwU/TxDAGP0pH9I/AAAAAAAAAmM/ftSTAqPqKXs/s320/IMG_0556.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3219404074301624822.post-40462144531375697332012-01-03T19:46:00.000-05:002012-01-03T19:46:38.242-05:00Frizzled Spicy Beef and Tostones (Fried Plantains)<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">I had leftover very tender pot roast in the refrigerator and two plantains that I picked up on a whim at the grocery store the other day. &nbsp;And I have two gallons of lard from the happy pastured pork we bought this fall. All of this made for a quick after gym meal. &nbsp;</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Plantains: &nbsp;Melt some lard in a deep pan (about 3/4 inch should do it). &nbsp;Peel, then slice the plantains about 1/4 inch thick on the diagonal. &nbsp;Drop in the hot lard. &nbsp;Fry gently until golden, remove, cool slightly, and then smash with a flat-bottomed object (I used a mortar). &nbsp;Re-fry until a slightly darker golden and remove. &nbsp;Surprisingly, these pick up very little oil. I sprinkled them with salt after the second frying.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Frizzled Beef: &nbsp;I made up the word "frizzled" to describe a shredded meat fried until there are some crispy bits along with tender meat. &nbsp;It almost has a hash-like consistency. &nbsp;I shredded the remains of the pot roast and spread it thinly in a frying pan. &nbsp;There was enough fat in the roast to frizzle the beef. &nbsp;I sprinkled the beef with a chili powder mix as it was frying. A little sour cream on the side is nice for dipping but you can easily leave it out if you don't do dairy.</span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Result:</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8SouXNgZNEI/TwOhIdqEsbI/AAAAAAAAAmE/ELkkzoicLtI/s1600/IMG_0550.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8SouXNgZNEI/TwOhIdqEsbI/AAAAAAAAAmE/ELkkzoicLtI/s320/IMG_0550.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Thanks to Caroline and Alex for help with the plantains!</span>Laurie D.noreply@blogger.com2